The Toolbox Method

Posted 5 CommentsPosted in Applied coaching, Coach development, Long term athlete development, Youth strength and conditioning

Some time ago I attended a UKSCA pre-conference seminar/workshop on strength and conditioning for youth athletes. There were numerous speakers including Joel Brannigan – then Head of Strength & Conditioning at Northumbria University. His lecture gave an overview of his role and responsibilities as a University level S&C coach in the UK. At the time […]

LTAD – BS or Brilliant? (Part 1)

Posted 1 CommentPosted in Applied coaching, Coach development, Long term athlete development, Youth strength and conditioning

“Long Term Athlete Development” or LTADĀ is a phrase that gets thrown around a lot in sport today. If you hang around any grassroots club long enough you’ll find some fancy chart on a wall with lots of nice colours and specific age brackets detailing how to turn your uncoordinated kid into the next (…insert famous […]

Youth Strength Training – Book Review

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Applied coaching, Book Reviews, Long term athlete development, Youth strength and conditioning

I’ve decided to start reviewing a book each month on a variety of topics from basic training principles, methodology, psychology and general youth-sport related topics. The reasons for these reviews are two fold: It forces me to think about my own development and ensure I read a book each month It may be useful to […]

Broken collarbones and the man-child

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Applied coaching, Coach development, Long term athlete development, Youth strength and conditioning

It was a crisp Sunday morning in Perth, Western Australia. I was still pretty drowsy from an early start to get to my football match on time. I was playing centre back. I remember everyone taking about how the other team had a “man-child” playing. This guy was an early-starter… I was about to find […]

The 10,000 hour rule – fact or fiction?

Posted 2 CommentsPosted in Coach development, myths, Uncategorized

If you’re involved in sport at any level (particularly grassroots) then you’ve probably come across the 10,000 hour rule, developed by Anders Ericsson. In simplest form, this “rule” suggests that it takes 10 years or 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to achieve “mastery”. Since this suggestion has become widely publicised, it has become the foundation […]

Not too little, not too much

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Applied coach, Coach development, Long term athlete development, sport psychology, Uncategorized, Youth strength and conditioning

Some time ago I attended a UKSport Talent Coaches Breakfast seminar at Bournemouth University, given by a sports psychology lecturer Bryan Jones. He told a story from his time working with a Midlands football club. He told us the story of two vastly different youth players. The first was recruited from Germany, a talented young […]